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General and digestive surgery

Find all the surgical interventions, lectures, experts opinions, debates, webinars and operative techniques per specialty.
Totally laparoscopic splenic flexure resection for cancer
The objective of this video is to demonstrate a laparoscopic segmental oncological splenic flexure colonic resection for cancer. Splenic flexure carcinoma is a rare condition, as it represents 3 to 8% of all colon cancers. It is associated with a high risk of obstruction and a poor prognosis. The surgical approach is challenging and not fully standardized. The resected area must include the mesocolon with major vessels ligation at their origin, in order to reduce local recurrence via the complete removal of potentially involved lymph node stations.
The oncological effectiveness of a segmental resection could be determined by the peculiar lymphatic spread of splenic flexure cancers. Different studies showed that the majority of positive lymph nodes among patients with splenic flexure carcinoma are distributed along the paracolic arcade and the left colic artery. As a result, a segmental resection associated with a medial-to-lateral approach could be safe and effective. The experience with a totally laparoscopic approach with intracorporeal anastomosis is well described in the current literature. Additionally, an intracorporeal anastomosis minimizes the risk of bowel twisting, preventing the exteriorization of the stumps, and reducing bowel traction, which can affect anastomotic irrigation, especially in obese patients. In a setting of surgeons experienced with laparoscopic colorectal surgery, the outcomes of laparoscopic segmental resection of splenic flexure are similar to those of laparoscopic resections for cancer in other locations.
G Basili, D Pietrasanta, N Romano, AF Costa
Surgical intervention
28 days ago
1054 views
4 likes
0 comments
10:12
Totally laparoscopic splenic flexure resection for cancer
The objective of this video is to demonstrate a laparoscopic segmental oncological splenic flexure colonic resection for cancer. Splenic flexure carcinoma is a rare condition, as it represents 3 to 8% of all colon cancers. It is associated with a high risk of obstruction and a poor prognosis. The surgical approach is challenging and not fully standardized. The resected area must include the mesocolon with major vessels ligation at their origin, in order to reduce local recurrence via the complete removal of potentially involved lymph node stations.
The oncological effectiveness of a segmental resection could be determined by the peculiar lymphatic spread of splenic flexure cancers. Different studies showed that the majority of positive lymph nodes among patients with splenic flexure carcinoma are distributed along the paracolic arcade and the left colic artery. As a result, a segmental resection associated with a medial-to-lateral approach could be safe and effective. The experience with a totally laparoscopic approach with intracorporeal anastomosis is well described in the current literature. Additionally, an intracorporeal anastomosis minimizes the risk of bowel twisting, preventing the exteriorization of the stumps, and reducing bowel traction, which can affect anastomotic irrigation, especially in obese patients. In a setting of surgeons experienced with laparoscopic colorectal surgery, the outcomes of laparoscopic segmental resection of splenic flexure are similar to those of laparoscopic resections for cancer in other locations.
Laparoscopic right colectomy: bottom-to-up approach with intracorporeal anastomosis
Introduction
Laparoscopic right colectomy (LRC) has become a well-established technique in colon cancer treatment achieving the same degree of radicality as open colectomy with the advantages of minimal invasion. A medial-to-lateral approach is the standard technique, but the bottom-to-up approach, with intracorporeal anastomosis (BTU), has recently gained popularity among surgeons.
Clinical case
The authors report the case of a 70-year-old male patient with persistent abdominal discomfort and a change in bowel habits. Preoperative staging revealed an adenocarcinoma at the hepatic flexure of the colon with no metastatic disease. The patient was proposed for a laparoscopic right colectomy.
A bottom-to-up approach was performed by opening an avascular plane posterior to the right mesocolon, creating a mesenteric route cranially along Gerota’s fascia until the duodenum and liver have been exposed. A side-to-side ileocolic intracorporeal stapled anastomosis was fashioned. The procedure and postoperative recovery were uneventful.
Discussion/Conclusion
LRC using a BTU approach is a feasible and safe alternative to the conventional medial-to-lateral approach. The main advantages are a short learning curve and an easy access to the retroperitoneal space with direct visualization and protection of retroperitoneal structures. The performance of an intracorporeal anastomosis offers the advantage of a smaller extraction incision, lower wound-related complications, and fast recovery.
J Magalhães, L Matos, J Costa, J Costa Pereira, G Gonçalves, M Nora
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
814 views
6 likes
3 comments
10:31
Laparoscopic right colectomy: bottom-to-up approach with intracorporeal anastomosis
Introduction
Laparoscopic right colectomy (LRC) has become a well-established technique in colon cancer treatment achieving the same degree of radicality as open colectomy with the advantages of minimal invasion. A medial-to-lateral approach is the standard technique, but the bottom-to-up approach, with intracorporeal anastomosis (BTU), has recently gained popularity among surgeons.
Clinical case
The authors report the case of a 70-year-old male patient with persistent abdominal discomfort and a change in bowel habits. Preoperative staging revealed an adenocarcinoma at the hepatic flexure of the colon with no metastatic disease. The patient was proposed for a laparoscopic right colectomy.
A bottom-to-up approach was performed by opening an avascular plane posterior to the right mesocolon, creating a mesenteric route cranially along Gerota’s fascia until the duodenum and liver have been exposed. A side-to-side ileocolic intracorporeal stapled anastomosis was fashioned. The procedure and postoperative recovery were uneventful.
Discussion/Conclusion
LRC using a BTU approach is a feasible and safe alternative to the conventional medial-to-lateral approach. The main advantages are a short learning curve and an easy access to the retroperitoneal space with direct visualization and protection of retroperitoneal structures. The performance of an intracorporeal anastomosis offers the advantage of a smaller extraction incision, lower wound-related complications, and fast recovery.
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: fully comprehensive demonstration of laparoscopic left hemicolectomy for synchronous adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon and rectosigmoid junction in an obese patient
In this live interactive surgery, Dr. Salvador Morales-Conde presents a case of synchronous sigmoid and rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma in an obese patient (BMI of 30). During mucosectomy of a sigmoid polyp at 20cm from the anal verge, a pTis adenocarcinoma was diagnosed when completely resected. A pT1 adenocarcinoma was biopsied at the rectosigmoid junction (12-15cm from the anal verge). Staging revealed no distant metastases. The operative technique shown consists in an oncological resection with mobilization of the splenic flexure.
S Morales-Conde, B Seeliger, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
3294 views
3 likes
0 comments
47:01
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: fully comprehensive demonstration of laparoscopic left hemicolectomy for synchronous adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon and rectosigmoid junction in an obese patient
In this live interactive surgery, Dr. Salvador Morales-Conde presents a case of synchronous sigmoid and rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma in an obese patient (BMI of 30). During mucosectomy of a sigmoid polyp at 20cm from the anal verge, a pTis adenocarcinoma was diagnosed when completely resected. A pT1 adenocarcinoma was biopsied at the rectosigmoid junction (12-15cm from the anal verge). Staging revealed no distant metastases. The operative technique shown consists in an oncological resection with mobilization of the splenic flexure.
Laparoscopic left hemicolectomy in a thin patient, including anastomotic control using intraoperative fluorescence
Usually, Body Mass Index (BMI) is correlated to the difficulty in performing the surgery. Obesity is associated with a more complex surgery and a longer operative time due to difficulties in finding the right plane of dissection and identifying the structures. However, treating a thin patient may also be dangerous because the planes of dissection are more adherent, which makes it harder to identify the real embryological dissection plane.
This video shows the danger of dissection when the mesocolon is very thin and adherent to Toldt’s fascia or Gerota’s fascia.

The nightmare of colon and rectum surgery is the leak of the anastomosis. It may occur also with all precaution: no anastomotic tension, the evaluation of the vascularization may be difficult because macroscopic lesion, when there is an ischemia, would appear after some hours; the use of the ICG test is a good tool to control the poor vascularization of the anastomosis earlier and to correct it, hence avoiding the drama of the leak.
S Rua
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
2324 views
9 likes
0 comments
13:14
Laparoscopic left hemicolectomy in a thin patient, including anastomotic control using intraoperative fluorescence
Usually, Body Mass Index (BMI) is correlated to the difficulty in performing the surgery. Obesity is associated with a more complex surgery and a longer operative time due to difficulties in finding the right plane of dissection and identifying the structures. However, treating a thin patient may also be dangerous because the planes of dissection are more adherent, which makes it harder to identify the real embryological dissection plane.
This video shows the danger of dissection when the mesocolon is very thin and adherent to Toldt’s fascia or Gerota’s fascia.

The nightmare of colon and rectum surgery is the leak of the anastomosis. It may occur also with all precaution: no anastomotic tension, the evaluation of the vascularization may be difficult because macroscopic lesion, when there is an ischemia, would appear after some hours; the use of the ICG test is a good tool to control the poor vascularization of the anastomosis earlier and to correct it, hence avoiding the drama of the leak.
Laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision (CME) right hemicolectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis
Complete mesocolic excision (CME) in colon cancer surgery has recently gained popularity as increasing evidence points to improved oncological clearance with superior lymph node yield, bigger tumor clearance margins, and higher quality surgical specimens. There are also some indications that it may lead to improved oncological outcomes. The tenets of CME include high vascular ligation at the root of the vessel, dissection along the embryological planes of the colonic mesentery, and adequate margins of bowel from the tumor.
Although the technique was initially described and achieved via a laparotomy, laparoscopic CME was also performed, although it was noted to be technically challenging. The right colon and the variability of vascular anatomy add to the difficulty of the procedure.
Extracorporeal anastomosis is commonly performed for right hemicolectomy in most centers. There are some reported advantages to the intracorporeal anastomosis, namely a potentially higher lymph node yield, a smaller skin incision, and the ability to extract the specimen via a Pfannenstiel’s incision, which has lower rates of incisional hernia.
This video features a laparoscopic CME right hemicolectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis for a malignant polyp.
SAE Yeo
Surgical intervention
9 months ago
8599 views
1071 likes
0 comments
13:33
Laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision (CME) right hemicolectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis
Complete mesocolic excision (CME) in colon cancer surgery has recently gained popularity as increasing evidence points to improved oncological clearance with superior lymph node yield, bigger tumor clearance margins, and higher quality surgical specimens. There are also some indications that it may lead to improved oncological outcomes. The tenets of CME include high vascular ligation at the root of the vessel, dissection along the embryological planes of the colonic mesentery, and adequate margins of bowel from the tumor.
Although the technique was initially described and achieved via a laparotomy, laparoscopic CME was also performed, although it was noted to be technically challenging. The right colon and the variability of vascular anatomy add to the difficulty of the procedure.
Extracorporeal anastomosis is commonly performed for right hemicolectomy in most centers. There are some reported advantages to the intracorporeal anastomosis, namely a potentially higher lymph node yield, a smaller skin incision, and the ability to extract the specimen via a Pfannenstiel’s incision, which has lower rates of incisional hernia.
This video features a laparoscopic CME right hemicolectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis for a malignant polyp.
Segmental left colectomy: a modified caudal-to-cranial approach
Note from the WeBSurg-IRCAD Scientific Committee:
This video entitled “Segmental left colectomy: a modified caudal-to-cranial approach" shows an original technique of segmental colonic resection for benign conditions. Although, in the present case, the indication is not specified, there seems to be a tattooing on a lesion, which would not correspond to the initial indication of benign conditions. The indication might be a polyp. Such indications remain rare. The given approach is difficult to perform for inflammatory pathologies generating significant adhesions. However, although the video quality is not ideal, it was decided to publish this film with a special mention “case for debate” stating that this is not the IRCAD position, but the technique can be discussed.
Note from the authors of the video:
We have designed a modified caudal-to-cranial approach to perform a laparoscopic left colectomy preserving the inferior mesenteric artery for benign colorectal diseases.
A dissection is performed to separate the descending mesocolon from the plane of Gerota's fascia from the medial aspect to the peritoneal lining to the left parietal gutter. The peritoneal layer is incised parallel to the vessel and close to the colonic wall. The dissection is continued anteriorly up to reach the resected parietal gutter. A passage into the mesentery of the upper rectum is created for the use of the stapler and the dissection of the rectum. These maneuvers allow to straighten the mesentery simplifying the identification and division of the sigmoid arteries. A caudal-to-cranial dissection of the mesentery is performed from the divided rectum to the proximal descending colon using a sealed envelope device. It can be very useful to mobilize the colon in any direction: laterally, medially, or upward. The dissection is performed along the course of the vessel up to the proximal colon, with progressive division of the sigmoid arterial branches. The specimen is extracted through a Pfannenstiel incision. The anastomosis is performed transanally with a circular stapler according to the Knight-Griffen technique.
M Milone, P Anoldo, M Manigrasso, F Milone
Surgical intervention
9 months ago
2949 views
504 likes
0 comments
09:27
Segmental left colectomy: a modified caudal-to-cranial approach
Note from the WeBSurg-IRCAD Scientific Committee:
This video entitled “Segmental left colectomy: a modified caudal-to-cranial approach" shows an original technique of segmental colonic resection for benign conditions. Although, in the present case, the indication is not specified, there seems to be a tattooing on a lesion, which would not correspond to the initial indication of benign conditions. The indication might be a polyp. Such indications remain rare. The given approach is difficult to perform for inflammatory pathologies generating significant adhesions. However, although the video quality is not ideal, it was decided to publish this film with a special mention “case for debate” stating that this is not the IRCAD position, but the technique can be discussed.
Note from the authors of the video:
We have designed a modified caudal-to-cranial approach to perform a laparoscopic left colectomy preserving the inferior mesenteric artery for benign colorectal diseases.
A dissection is performed to separate the descending mesocolon from the plane of Gerota's fascia from the medial aspect to the peritoneal lining to the left parietal gutter. The peritoneal layer is incised parallel to the vessel and close to the colonic wall. The dissection is continued anteriorly up to reach the resected parietal gutter. A passage into the mesentery of the upper rectum is created for the use of the stapler and the dissection of the rectum. These maneuvers allow to straighten the mesentery simplifying the identification and division of the sigmoid arteries. A caudal-to-cranial dissection of the mesentery is performed from the divided rectum to the proximal descending colon using a sealed envelope device. It can be very useful to mobilize the colon in any direction: laterally, medially, or upward. The dissection is performed along the course of the vessel up to the proximal colon, with progressive division of the sigmoid arterial branches. The specimen is extracted through a Pfannenstiel incision. The anastomosis is performed transanally with a circular stapler according to the Knight-Griffen technique.
Mobilization of the right colon for Chilaiditi syndrome in a 38-year-old patient
This video demonstrates our laparoscopic approach to the right colon for Chilaiditi syndrome with recurrent episodes of bowel obstruction.
A 38-year-old man with Down syndrome was admitted to our emergency department for acute abdominal pain and vomiting. The objective signs and radiographic findings were indicative of bowel obstruction. In his last few years, he was admitted multiple times to the emergency department for mechanical bowel obstruction. Both CT-scan and MRI showed medial dislocation of the liver and transposition of the right colon and small bowel loops in between the diaphragm and the liver. We propose a specific port-site layout and a counterclockwise approach, to allow for the correct triangulation of surgical instruments especially during the mobilization of the hepatic flexure, which is often the most critical phase of the operation. Starting from the mobilization of the transverse colon and proceeding towards the caecum we take advantage of gravity in handling the right colon. The operative time was 90 minutes. The patient recovered with no complications and was discharged on postoperative day 6. His symptoms disappeared completely.
M Lotti, E Poiasina, G Panyor, M Giulii Capponi
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
2439 views
443 likes
0 comments
11:18
Mobilization of the right colon for Chilaiditi syndrome in a 38-year-old patient
This video demonstrates our laparoscopic approach to the right colon for Chilaiditi syndrome with recurrent episodes of bowel obstruction.
A 38-year-old man with Down syndrome was admitted to our emergency department for acute abdominal pain and vomiting. The objective signs and radiographic findings were indicative of bowel obstruction. In his last few years, he was admitted multiple times to the emergency department for mechanical bowel obstruction. Both CT-scan and MRI showed medial dislocation of the liver and transposition of the right colon and small bowel loops in between the diaphragm and the liver. We propose a specific port-site layout and a counterclockwise approach, to allow for the correct triangulation of surgical instruments especially during the mobilization of the hepatic flexure, which is often the most critical phase of the operation. Starting from the mobilization of the transverse colon and proceeding towards the caecum we take advantage of gravity in handling the right colon. The operative time was 90 minutes. The patient recovered with no complications and was discharged on postoperative day 6. His symptoms disappeared completely.
Laparoscopic right hemicolectomy with complete mesocolic excision for advanced ascending colon cancer
Complete mesocolic excision (CME) with central vascular ligation (CVL) is a potentially superior oncological technique in colon cancer surgery. The tenets of high vascular ligation at the origin and mesocolic dissection facilitate a greater lymph node yield. We present the case of a 70-year-old lady with chronic right iliac fossa discomfort. Computer tomographic scans showed a bulky ascending colon cancer with a 2.6cm right mesocolic lymph node. She underwent laparoscopic CME right hemicolectomy with CVL. Three operative trocars were used (a 12mm trocar in the left iliac fossa, 5mm ports in the left flank and right iliac fossa). Dissection begins in an inferior to superior approach, starting with mobilization of the ileocolic mesentery off the right common iliac vessels, then progressing to separate the mesentery off the duodenum and Gerota's fascia, exposing the head of the pancreas and the duodenal loop. CVL begins with the identification of the superior mesenteric vein (SMV). The vascular structures are isolated individually and ligated high at the level of the SMV, removing the metastatic right mesocolic node ‘en bloc’. Following proximal and distal transections, an intracorporeal ileo-transverse anastomosis is performed. Histology findings demonstrate the presence of a pT4a N2a M0 mucinous adenocarcinoma with 5 out of 17 lymph nodes (including the large mesocolic lymph node) positive for metastasis.
JL Ng, SAE Yeo
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
11313 views
1169 likes
0 comments
05:37
Laparoscopic right hemicolectomy with complete mesocolic excision for advanced ascending colon cancer
Complete mesocolic excision (CME) with central vascular ligation (CVL) is a potentially superior oncological technique in colon cancer surgery. The tenets of high vascular ligation at the origin and mesocolic dissection facilitate a greater lymph node yield. We present the case of a 70-year-old lady with chronic right iliac fossa discomfort. Computer tomographic scans showed a bulky ascending colon cancer with a 2.6cm right mesocolic lymph node. She underwent laparoscopic CME right hemicolectomy with CVL. Three operative trocars were used (a 12mm trocar in the left iliac fossa, 5mm ports in the left flank and right iliac fossa). Dissection begins in an inferior to superior approach, starting with mobilization of the ileocolic mesentery off the right common iliac vessels, then progressing to separate the mesentery off the duodenum and Gerota's fascia, exposing the head of the pancreas and the duodenal loop. CVL begins with the identification of the superior mesenteric vein (SMV). The vascular structures are isolated individually and ligated high at the level of the SMV, removing the metastatic right mesocolic node ‘en bloc’. Following proximal and distal transections, an intracorporeal ileo-transverse anastomosis is performed. Histology findings demonstrate the presence of a pT4a N2a M0 mucinous adenocarcinoma with 5 out of 17 lymph nodes (including the large mesocolic lymph node) positive for metastasis.
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: Interactive discussion around splenic flexure during laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for cancer
In this educational video, Professor Luc Soler gives a brief introduction of 3D reconstruction and modeling. Dr. Corcione introduces the main principles of trocar and port placement. He briefly demonstrates the technical aspects, main principles and key steps of laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for cancer in a 61-year-old male patient in a live interactive surgery. He highlights the technical aspects and main principles of lesser sac opening, vascular identification and division, splenic flexure mobilization, lateral mobilization, transection, suprapubic incision for specimen removal, and EEA anastomosis.
F Corcione, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
6005 views
320 likes
0 comments
58:02
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: Interactive discussion around splenic flexure during laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for cancer
In this educational video, Professor Luc Soler gives a brief introduction of 3D reconstruction and modeling. Dr. Corcione introduces the main principles of trocar and port placement. He briefly demonstrates the technical aspects, main principles and key steps of laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for cancer in a 61-year-old male patient in a live interactive surgery. He highlights the technical aspects and main principles of lesser sac opening, vascular identification and division, splenic flexure mobilization, lateral mobilization, transection, suprapubic incision for specimen removal, and EEA anastomosis.
The 3 approaches to splenic flexure mobilization
Background: The mobilization of the splenic flexure during laparoscopic colorectal surgery can be a challenge, especially in anatomically difficult patients. In this video, the inframesocolic, the supramesocolic, and lateral-to-medial approaches are demonstrated.

Video: The first part of the video shows the inframesocolic approach where the opening of the transverse mesocolon, above the pancreatic body and tail, allows access to the lesser sac and the exposure of the spleen. The second part of the video shows the supramesocolic approach where reaching Gerota’s fascia allows the flexure to be taken down. The third part of the video shows the lateral-to-medial approach where opening the lesser sac allows the flexure to be mobilized.

Results: All three approaches are laparoscopically feasible and safe. The goal remains similar, that is to avoid anastomotic tension. The operative time for this step, during the entire colorectal procedure, is influenced by the patient’s characteristics (previous surgery, high splenic flexure, short mesentery, etc.) and obviously, by the surgeon’s learning curve.

Conclusions: The choice between the three approaches depends on the patient’s characteristics and on the surgeon’s habits.
G Dapri, NA Bascombe, GB Cadière, J Marks
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
4160 views
340 likes
0 comments
11:51
The 3 approaches to splenic flexure mobilization
Background: The mobilization of the splenic flexure during laparoscopic colorectal surgery can be a challenge, especially in anatomically difficult patients. In this video, the inframesocolic, the supramesocolic, and lateral-to-medial approaches are demonstrated.

Video: The first part of the video shows the inframesocolic approach where the opening of the transverse mesocolon, above the pancreatic body and tail, allows access to the lesser sac and the exposure of the spleen. The second part of the video shows the supramesocolic approach where reaching Gerota’s fascia allows the flexure to be taken down. The third part of the video shows the lateral-to-medial approach where opening the lesser sac allows the flexure to be mobilized.

Results: All three approaches are laparoscopically feasible and safe. The goal remains similar, that is to avoid anastomotic tension. The operative time for this step, during the entire colorectal procedure, is influenced by the patient’s characteristics (previous surgery, high splenic flexure, short mesentery, etc.) and obviously, by the surgeon’s learning curve.

Conclusions: The choice between the three approaches depends on the patient’s characteristics and on the surgeon’s habits.
Laparoscopic left complete mesocolic excision for stented descending colon cancer
Complete mesocolic excision (CME) with central vessel ligation (CVL) was first introduced with the aim to preserve an intact layer of mesocolon, containing all blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, lymph nodes, and surrounding soft tissue during colorectal cancer resection. The supplying vessels are also transected at their origin for optimal oncological outcomes. This method has been extensively studied in right colonic cancers with improvement in local recurrence and survival rates when compared to the conventional approach. Its excellent results are attributed to the superior lymph node harvest and removal of disseminated cancer cells in the surrounding soft tissue. Similarly, such advantages can be translated to left hemicolectomy with the use of CME with a CVL approach. Additionally, in left hemicolectomy, the vessels ligated (left branch of middle colic and left colic) are branches of vessels from the aorta rather than from the aorta directly, often limiting lymph node harvest. CME with CVL can help to overcome this limitation in left hemicolectomy. We present a video of a laparoscopic CME and CVL in a 48-year-old Chinese male with large bowel obstruction secondary to a descending colonic tumor which was successfully stented one week before.
SAE Yeo, MH Chang
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
2895 views
315 likes
0 comments
08:47
Laparoscopic left complete mesocolic excision for stented descending colon cancer
Complete mesocolic excision (CME) with central vessel ligation (CVL) was first introduced with the aim to preserve an intact layer of mesocolon, containing all blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, lymph nodes, and surrounding soft tissue during colorectal cancer resection. The supplying vessels are also transected at their origin for optimal oncological outcomes. This method has been extensively studied in right colonic cancers with improvement in local recurrence and survival rates when compared to the conventional approach. Its excellent results are attributed to the superior lymph node harvest and removal of disseminated cancer cells in the surrounding soft tissue. Similarly, such advantages can be translated to left hemicolectomy with the use of CME with a CVL approach. Additionally, in left hemicolectomy, the vessels ligated (left branch of middle colic and left colic) are branches of vessels from the aorta rather than from the aorta directly, often limiting lymph node harvest. CME with CVL can help to overcome this limitation in left hemicolectomy. We present a video of a laparoscopic CME and CVL in a 48-year-old Chinese male with large bowel obstruction secondary to a descending colonic tumor which was successfully stented one week before.
Suprapubic single-incision laparoscopic splenic flexure resection with hand-sewn intracorporeal anastomosis
Background: The authors report the case of a 30-year-old woman who consulted for episodes of diverticulitis due to segmental diverticulosis of the splenic flexure. The patient was scheduled for a suprapubic single incision laparoscopic splenic flexure resection.

Video: A right suprapubic incision was performed and allowed for the introduction of three abdominal trocars (11mm, and two 6mm ones). DAPRI curved reusable instruments (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) were used, in addition to a 10mm, 30-degree regular length scope. The mobilization of the left mesocolon as well as of the transverse mesocolon was performed. After having completely freed the splenic flexure from its attachments, the transverse colon and the left colon were divided using an articulating linear stapler, introduced into the abdomen under a 5mm, 30-degree long scope. An intracorporeal end-to-end transverse sigmoid anastomosis was performed using two converging running sutures. The mesocolic defect was closed. The specimen was removed through a single access and final scar appeared to be 4cm.

Results: Laparoscopic time was 165 minutes and time to perform the anastomosis was 60 minutes. Operative bleeding was 10cc. The patient was discharged after 4 days, and at visit consultations, the symptoms were resolved.

Conclusion: Single incision laparoscopic splenic flexure resection can be safely performed using a suprapubic access, which enhances cosmetic outcomes, in addition to the advantages of minimally invasive surgery. A laparoscopic intracorporeal anastomosis is mandatory and can be performed using a hand-sewn method.
G Dapri, L Cardinali, A Cadenas Febres, GB Cadière
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1568 views
92 likes
0 comments
07:12
Suprapubic single-incision laparoscopic splenic flexure resection with hand-sewn intracorporeal anastomosis
Background: The authors report the case of a 30-year-old woman who consulted for episodes of diverticulitis due to segmental diverticulosis of the splenic flexure. The patient was scheduled for a suprapubic single incision laparoscopic splenic flexure resection.

Video: A right suprapubic incision was performed and allowed for the introduction of three abdominal trocars (11mm, and two 6mm ones). DAPRI curved reusable instruments (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) were used, in addition to a 10mm, 30-degree regular length scope. The mobilization of the left mesocolon as well as of the transverse mesocolon was performed. After having completely freed the splenic flexure from its attachments, the transverse colon and the left colon were divided using an articulating linear stapler, introduced into the abdomen under a 5mm, 30-degree long scope. An intracorporeal end-to-end transverse sigmoid anastomosis was performed using two converging running sutures. The mesocolic defect was closed. The specimen was removed through a single access and final scar appeared to be 4cm.

Results: Laparoscopic time was 165 minutes and time to perform the anastomosis was 60 minutes. Operative bleeding was 10cc. The patient was discharged after 4 days, and at visit consultations, the symptoms were resolved.

Conclusion: Single incision laparoscopic splenic flexure resection can be safely performed using a suprapubic access, which enhances cosmetic outcomes, in addition to the advantages of minimally invasive surgery. A laparoscopic intracorporeal anastomosis is mandatory and can be performed using a hand-sewn method.
Mixed robotic laparoscopic synchronous left colectomy and left renal tumor enucleation
A 45-year-old woman with abdominal pain and hematochezia was found with adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon causing incomplete obstruction. CT-scan revealed a 5cm exophytic tumor of the superior pole of the left kidney.
Synchronous Left Colectomy (LC) and Renal Tumor Enucleation (RTE) were scheduled. Robotic surgery was preferred for RTE, but when performed first, splenic flexure mobilization could well interfere with subsequent LC.

Starting with a standard robotic LC would make multiple dockings and patient position changes necessary.
To overcome these problems, we adapted the technique of LC to the lateral position required for RTE and performed robotic vascular ligation of the left colon first. Robotic left colon mobilization and RTE were then performed to finally achieve colectomy and colorectal anastomosis by means of laparoscopy with the patient in a standard lithotomy position.
The procedure required only one docking of the robot and only one change in patient position. A compromise in port site positioning was obtained between the two procedures. One short incision was performed to retrieve both specimens and the same robotic instruments were used for both procedures.
Operative time was 350 minutes. The patient recovered well and no complications were noted. She was discharged on postoperative day 7.
M Lotti, RLJ Naspro, L Rocchini, L Campanati, L Da Pozzo, L Ansaloni
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
1206 views
42 likes
0 comments
16:25
Mixed robotic laparoscopic synchronous left colectomy and left renal tumor enucleation
A 45-year-old woman with abdominal pain and hematochezia was found with adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon causing incomplete obstruction. CT-scan revealed a 5cm exophytic tumor of the superior pole of the left kidney.
Synchronous Left Colectomy (LC) and Renal Tumor Enucleation (RTE) were scheduled. Robotic surgery was preferred for RTE, but when performed first, splenic flexure mobilization could well interfere with subsequent LC.

Starting with a standard robotic LC would make multiple dockings and patient position changes necessary.
To overcome these problems, we adapted the technique of LC to the lateral position required for RTE and performed robotic vascular ligation of the left colon first. Robotic left colon mobilization and RTE were then performed to finally achieve colectomy and colorectal anastomosis by means of laparoscopy with the patient in a standard lithotomy position.
The procedure required only one docking of the robot and only one change in patient position. A compromise in port site positioning was obtained between the two procedures. One short incision was performed to retrieve both specimens and the same robotic instruments were used for both procedures.
Operative time was 350 minutes. The patient recovered well and no complications were noted. She was discharged on postoperative day 7.
Laparoscopic anterior resection for locally advanced sigmoid cancer with 'en bloc' excision of bladder cuff
We present an operative video of a 61-year-old Chinese gentleman with locally advanced sigmoid carcinoma. Preoperative histology from endoscopy revealed an adenocarcinoma. The patient underwent laparoscopic anterior resection. Intraoperatively, the sigmoid tumor was adherent to the bladder with surrounding inflammation and edema. The colectomy had to be performed with an ‘en bloc’ excision of a bladder cuff. The bladder defect was repaired laparoscopically in two layers. Operative time was 4 hours 15 minutes and total blood loss was less than 100mL. The patient was discharged in good health conditions, four days after the operation with an outpatient cystogram performed before subsequent successful removal of the indwelling catheter. Final histology was pT4bN0 (0/31 lymph nodes) with clear margins. This case demonstrates that laparoscopic colectomy with ‘en bloc’ bladder cuff excision and subsequent laparoscopic repair of bladder defect are both feasible and safe.
S Mantoo, E Yong
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
3129 views
139 likes
0 comments
07:26
Laparoscopic anterior resection for locally advanced sigmoid cancer with 'en bloc' excision of bladder cuff
We present an operative video of a 61-year-old Chinese gentleman with locally advanced sigmoid carcinoma. Preoperative histology from endoscopy revealed an adenocarcinoma. The patient underwent laparoscopic anterior resection. Intraoperatively, the sigmoid tumor was adherent to the bladder with surrounding inflammation and edema. The colectomy had to be performed with an ‘en bloc’ excision of a bladder cuff. The bladder defect was repaired laparoscopically in two layers. Operative time was 4 hours 15 minutes and total blood loss was less than 100mL. The patient was discharged in good health conditions, four days after the operation with an outpatient cystogram performed before subsequent successful removal of the indwelling catheter. Final histology was pT4bN0 (0/31 lymph nodes) with clear margins. This case demonstrates that laparoscopic colectomy with ‘en bloc’ bladder cuff excision and subsequent laparoscopic repair of bladder defect are both feasible and safe.
Can we reduce complications in laparoscopic colorectal surgery?
Laparoscopic colorectal surgery comprises many different types of procedures for various diseases. In general, surgical complications can be divided into intraoperative and postoperative complications, and usually occur while the patient is still in the hospital. Over the recent decade, the improvement of different treatment strategies and technical inventions has been tremendous. This is mainly attributable to the increase use of the laparoscopic approach, which is now well-accepted for many procedures. Training of the surgeon, hospital volume, and learning curves are becoming increasingly more important to maximize patient safety, surgeon expertise, and cost-effectiveness. The standardization of perioperative care is essential to minimize postoperative complications. In this key lecture, Dr. Barry Salky provides an overview, namely how to identify and minimize intraoperative and postoperative complications.
B Salky
Lecture
3 years ago
1077 views
16 likes
0 comments
20:59
Can we reduce complications in laparoscopic colorectal surgery?
Laparoscopic colorectal surgery comprises many different types of procedures for various diseases. In general, surgical complications can be divided into intraoperative and postoperative complications, and usually occur while the patient is still in the hospital. Over the recent decade, the improvement of different treatment strategies and technical inventions has been tremendous. This is mainly attributable to the increase use of the laparoscopic approach, which is now well-accepted for many procedures. Training of the surgeon, hospital volume, and learning curves are becoming increasingly more important to maximize patient safety, surgeon expertise, and cost-effectiveness. The standardization of perioperative care is essential to minimize postoperative complications. In this key lecture, Dr. Barry Salky provides an overview, namely how to identify and minimize intraoperative and postoperative complications.
Laparoscopic right hemicolectomy (mesocolic excision) in advanced right colonic tumor with parietal fixation (T4)
Similar to TME in rectal cancer, a comparable approach for the surgical resection of colonic cancers is described as complete mesocolic excision (CME), which includes central vascular ligation and dissection in the mesocolic space. According to a recently published Danish study, a 4-year disease-free survival (DFS) in the CME group was 85.8% whereas it was 75.9 % in the conventional group. Here, we present a video demonstration of laparoscopic right radical hemicolectomy in which complete mesocolic excision was performed. The mesocolic layer was identified as a shiny avascular film, which was preserved during the procedure in order to limit tumor dissemination. In this medial to lateral approach, the first duodenum is identified by incising the peritoneum and using a gauze piece for dissection purposes in an avascular plane, making sure to preserve the mesocolon. The right colic vessel is identified and clipped. The right branch of the middle colic artery and the ileocolic vessel are ligated. All fibrotic and adipose tissues are swept along with the specimen, and the ureter and gonadal vessels are dissected away. Lateral mobilization is achieved, and the specimen is then removed through small transverse incision to prepare for an extracorporeal ileo-transverse anastomosis.
S Puntambekar, V Sharma, H Parikh, G Joshi, S Mitkare, A Dokrimare
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
15013 views
593 likes
2 comments
11:00
Laparoscopic right hemicolectomy (mesocolic excision) in advanced right colonic tumor with parietal fixation (T4)
Similar to TME in rectal cancer, a comparable approach for the surgical resection of colonic cancers is described as complete mesocolic excision (CME), which includes central vascular ligation and dissection in the mesocolic space. According to a recently published Danish study, a 4-year disease-free survival (DFS) in the CME group was 85.8% whereas it was 75.9 % in the conventional group. Here, we present a video demonstration of laparoscopic right radical hemicolectomy in which complete mesocolic excision was performed. The mesocolic layer was identified as a shiny avascular film, which was preserved during the procedure in order to limit tumor dissemination. In this medial to lateral approach, the first duodenum is identified by incising the peritoneum and using a gauze piece for dissection purposes in an avascular plane, making sure to preserve the mesocolon. The right colic vessel is identified and clipped. The right branch of the middle colic artery and the ileocolic vessel are ligated. All fibrotic and adipose tissues are swept along with the specimen, and the ureter and gonadal vessels are dissected away. Lateral mobilization is achieved, and the specimen is then removed through small transverse incision to prepare for an extracorporeal ileo-transverse anastomosis.
Successful closure of iatrogenic colonic perforation with Over-The-Scope Clip™ system (OVESCO™) after failed attempt with standard endoscopic clips
Iatrogenic colonic perforation is a rare complication which has been reported in 0.03%-0.8% of cases during diagnostic colonoscopy. The sigmoid colon and the rectosigmoid junction are the most common sites of perforation during diagnostic examination. Successful endoscopic closure of the defect has been reported using standard clips. However, in case of large defects, standard clips are often ineffective. OTSC™ clips are devices which are successfully used to close wall defects up to 25mm. They make it possible to continue the endoscopic procedure after wall defect closure. In this video, we show the successful closure of a sigmoid colonic iatrogenic perforation in a 50-year-old woman by means of the Over The Scope Clip™ system (OVESCO® Endoscopy, Germany) (11/6 t) after failed attempt with standard clips. OVESCO™ was applied with a standard gastroscope using the suction technique by pushing the cap against the edges of the defect. In order to prevent incarceration of adjacent structures a soft aspiration of the omentum was applied and the OVESCO™ was carefully deployed. Carbon dioxide insufflation was used. Antibiotic therapy was started and the patient was discharged 5 days later. In conclusion, the Over The Scope Clip™ (OTSC™) is a safe surgery-sparing tool which allows for a successful iatrogenic perforation closure of the GI tract, performing omentoplasty by means of a suction technique.
Gf Donatelli
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1293 views
31 likes
1 comment
02:28
Successful closure of iatrogenic colonic perforation with Over-The-Scope Clip™ system (OVESCO™) after failed attempt with standard endoscopic clips
Iatrogenic colonic perforation is a rare complication which has been reported in 0.03%-0.8% of cases during diagnostic colonoscopy. The sigmoid colon and the rectosigmoid junction are the most common sites of perforation during diagnostic examination. Successful endoscopic closure of the defect has been reported using standard clips. However, in case of large defects, standard clips are often ineffective. OTSC™ clips are devices which are successfully used to close wall defects up to 25mm. They make it possible to continue the endoscopic procedure after wall defect closure. In this video, we show the successful closure of a sigmoid colonic iatrogenic perforation in a 50-year-old woman by means of the Over The Scope Clip™ system (OVESCO® Endoscopy, Germany) (11/6 t) after failed attempt with standard clips. OVESCO™ was applied with a standard gastroscope using the suction technique by pushing the cap against the edges of the defect. In order to prevent incarceration of adjacent structures a soft aspiration of the omentum was applied and the OVESCO™ was carefully deployed. Carbon dioxide insufflation was used. Antibiotic therapy was started and the patient was discharged 5 days later. In conclusion, the Over The Scope Clip™ (OTSC™) is a safe surgery-sparing tool which allows for a successful iatrogenic perforation closure of the GI tract, performing omentoplasty by means of a suction technique.
Laparoscopic repair of colorectal leak and fistula using a new transanal reusable platform
Background: Transanal minimally invasive surgery has triggered much interest and investment in research over the last decade. This approach can be used not only to perform primary procedures (e.g., polypectomy, TME), but also to manage intraoperative complications such as leaks, bleedings, and late complications such as fistulas.
Video: The first part of the video shows the repair of an immediate colorectal leak using transanal laparoscopy, in a 50-year-old woman who underwent a laparoscopic anterior resection of the rectum. During anastomotic control, a posterior leak 4cm away from the anal margin was found. A new transanal reusable port, named DAPRI Port or D-Port (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany), along with DAPRI monocurved reusable instruments, was implemented. The second part of the video shows a persisting and symptomatic colorectal fistula, located posteriorly 11cm away from the anal margin, in a 65-year-old man who had undergone a laparoscopic anterior resection of the rectum 4 weeks earlier.
Results: Operative time was 60 and 45 minutes respectively. Patients were discharged after 5 and 2 days respectively. Controls at 2 months (before ileostomy closure) showed a complete healing of the defects.
Conclusions: Complications after anterior resection of the rectum, such as intraoperative leak and late colorectal fistula, can be treated using transanal laparoscopy. This new transanal platform offers surgeons the possibility to work in ergonomic positions without increasing the cost of the procedure thanks to the reusable nature of the material adopted.
G Dapri, D Guta, K Grozdev, L Antolino, K Jottard, GB Cadière
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1623 views
33 likes
0 comments
05:55
Laparoscopic repair of colorectal leak and fistula using a new transanal reusable platform
Background: Transanal minimally invasive surgery has triggered much interest and investment in research over the last decade. This approach can be used not only to perform primary procedures (e.g., polypectomy, TME), but also to manage intraoperative complications such as leaks, bleedings, and late complications such as fistulas.
Video: The first part of the video shows the repair of an immediate colorectal leak using transanal laparoscopy, in a 50-year-old woman who underwent a laparoscopic anterior resection of the rectum. During anastomotic control, a posterior leak 4cm away from the anal margin was found. A new transanal reusable port, named DAPRI Port or D-Port (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany), along with DAPRI monocurved reusable instruments, was implemented. The second part of the video shows a persisting and symptomatic colorectal fistula, located posteriorly 11cm away from the anal margin, in a 65-year-old man who had undergone a laparoscopic anterior resection of the rectum 4 weeks earlier.
Results: Operative time was 60 and 45 minutes respectively. Patients were discharged after 5 and 2 days respectively. Controls at 2 months (before ileostomy closure) showed a complete healing of the defects.
Conclusions: Complications after anterior resection of the rectum, such as intraoperative leak and late colorectal fistula, can be treated using transanal laparoscopy. This new transanal platform offers surgeons the possibility to work in ergonomic positions without increasing the cost of the procedure thanks to the reusable nature of the material adopted.
Manual colorectal anastomosis during suprapubic single incision laparoscopic left hemicolectomy
Background: Single incision laparoscopic left hemicolectomy is a feasible procedure. A suprapubic access allows to offer satisfactory cosmetic results in case of an extended scar due to a large tumor. An intracorporeal circular mechanical anastomosis is the most common type. A manual anastomosis is feasible and allows to control lumen opening, potential bleeding, and overall to overcome the difficulty of transanal stapler insertion in case of high rectal transection.
Video: This video shows two different types of manual colorectal anastomosis, through a right suprapubic access.
1) Double-layer end-to-end
2) Monolayer end-to-end
Results: After an appropriate learning curve, time to perform the manual anastomosis is 40 minutes.
Conclusions: Different colorectal anastomoses can be performed and the surgeon has to choose the appropriate one, case by case.
To watch the video demonstrating the entire left hemicolectomy, please click here.
G Dapri
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
3728 views
85 likes
0 comments
04:02
Manual colorectal anastomosis during suprapubic single incision laparoscopic left hemicolectomy
Background: Single incision laparoscopic left hemicolectomy is a feasible procedure. A suprapubic access allows to offer satisfactory cosmetic results in case of an extended scar due to a large tumor. An intracorporeal circular mechanical anastomosis is the most common type. A manual anastomosis is feasible and allows to control lumen opening, potential bleeding, and overall to overcome the difficulty of transanal stapler insertion in case of high rectal transection.
Video: This video shows two different types of manual colorectal anastomosis, through a right suprapubic access.
1) Double-layer end-to-end
2) Monolayer end-to-end
Results: After an appropriate learning curve, time to perform the manual anastomosis is 40 minutes.
Conclusions: Different colorectal anastomoses can be performed and the surgeon has to choose the appropriate one, case by case.
To watch the video demonstrating the entire left hemicolectomy, please click here.
Four different intracorporeal ileocolic anastomoses during suprapubic single incision laparoscopic right hemicolectomy
Background: Single incision laparoscopic right hemicolectomy is a feasible procedure. Suprapubic access allows to offer satisfactory cosmetic results in case of extended scar due to a large tumor. Intracorporeal anastomosis is mandatory through a suprapubic access, because it prevents traction on the mesentery and on the transverse mesocolon.
Video: This video shows four different types of intracorporeal ileocolic anastomoses.
1) Linear mechanical side-to-side
2) Completely manual side-to-side
3) Completely manual end-to-side
4) Completely manual end-to-end
At the end of each type of anastomosis, mesenteric defect closure is mandatory, to prevent intestinal obstruction caused by internal hernia.
Results: After an appropriate learning curve, time to perform linear mechanical anastomosis is 25 minutes and manual anastomosis takes 40 minutes.
Conclusions: Different ileocolic anastomoses can be performed and the surgeon has to choose the appropriate one, case by case.
To watch the video demonstrating the entire right hemicolectomy, please click here.
G Dapri
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
3631 views
177 likes
0 comments
07:58
Four different intracorporeal ileocolic anastomoses during suprapubic single incision laparoscopic right hemicolectomy
Background: Single incision laparoscopic right hemicolectomy is a feasible procedure. Suprapubic access allows to offer satisfactory cosmetic results in case of extended scar due to a large tumor. Intracorporeal anastomosis is mandatory through a suprapubic access, because it prevents traction on the mesentery and on the transverse mesocolon.
Video: This video shows four different types of intracorporeal ileocolic anastomoses.
1) Linear mechanical side-to-side
2) Completely manual side-to-side
3) Completely manual end-to-side
4) Completely manual end-to-end
At the end of each type of anastomosis, mesenteric defect closure is mandatory, to prevent intestinal obstruction caused by internal hernia.
Results: After an appropriate learning curve, time to perform linear mechanical anastomosis is 25 minutes and manual anastomosis takes 40 minutes.
Conclusions: Different ileocolic anastomoses can be performed and the surgeon has to choose the appropriate one, case by case.
To watch the video demonstrating the entire right hemicolectomy, please click here.
Chronic sigmoidovesical fistula: laparoscopic management
The most frequent underlying cause of sigmoidovesical fistula is complicated diverticular disease in 60% of cases followed by colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease. It occurs in about 2 to 22% of patients with known diverticular disease. In diverticular sigmoid vesical chronic fistula, the preferred therapeutic management is represented by primary resection with anastomosis performed as a one-stage procedure. It is particularly true when the fistula is located between the vesical dome and the sigmoid colon distally from the trigone vesical. In this video, we demonstrate the laparoscopic management of a chronic sigmoidovesical fistula after acute sigmoid diverticulitis as a one-stage procedure.
J Leroy, A D'Urso, H Jeddou, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1947 views
60 likes
1 comment
07:01
Chronic sigmoidovesical fistula: laparoscopic management
The most frequent underlying cause of sigmoidovesical fistula is complicated diverticular disease in 60% of cases followed by colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease. It occurs in about 2 to 22% of patients with known diverticular disease. In diverticular sigmoid vesical chronic fistula, the preferred therapeutic management is represented by primary resection with anastomosis performed as a one-stage procedure. It is particularly true when the fistula is located between the vesical dome and the sigmoid colon distally from the trigone vesical. In this video, we demonstrate the laparoscopic management of a chronic sigmoidovesical fistula after acute sigmoid diverticulitis as a one-stage procedure.
Single port laparoscopic-assisted ileocolic resection for recurrent Crohn's disease
Background: Here we demonstrate a single port laparoscopic ileocolic resection technique in a patient with Crohn’s disease and recurrent anastomotic stricturing despite prior ileocaecal resection and medication.
Procedure: The procedure is begun with a 3cm transumbilical incision. After safe peritoneal entry, a wound protector-retractor was placed into the wound and then sealed for laparoscopy with a surgical glove port. Thereafter, the operation proceeded using a 30-degree high definition laparoscope with sterile in-line cabling (EndoEYE™, Olympus Corporation) along with other standard, rigid instrumentation (primarily an atraumatic grasper and a LigaSure™ sealer-cutter, Covidien). The strictured anastomotic segment was cleared of an omental adhesion and mobilized laterally. The proximal colon was fully mobilized and the duodenum as well as right gonadal vessels and ureter were clearly preserved. After medialization of the diseased segment, the glove port was removed and the specimen extracted (without further fascial extension) via the single port access site. A side-to-side stapled anastomosis was performed in the usual fashion and re-laparoscopy done after return of the bowel into the peritoneum.
Comment: Single port laparoscopic-assisted surgery is applicable to the re-operative setting in selected patients. Its advantages particularly apply to young patients who value body image and reduced scarring.
F Narouz, R Cahill
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
2258 views
44 likes
0 comments
12:34
Single port laparoscopic-assisted ileocolic resection for recurrent Crohn's disease
Background: Here we demonstrate a single port laparoscopic ileocolic resection technique in a patient with Crohn’s disease and recurrent anastomotic stricturing despite prior ileocaecal resection and medication.
Procedure: The procedure is begun with a 3cm transumbilical incision. After safe peritoneal entry, a wound protector-retractor was placed into the wound and then sealed for laparoscopy with a surgical glove port. Thereafter, the operation proceeded using a 30-degree high definition laparoscope with sterile in-line cabling (EndoEYE™, Olympus Corporation) along with other standard, rigid instrumentation (primarily an atraumatic grasper and a LigaSure™ sealer-cutter, Covidien). The strictured anastomotic segment was cleared of an omental adhesion and mobilized laterally. The proximal colon was fully mobilized and the duodenum as well as right gonadal vessels and ureter were clearly preserved. After medialization of the diseased segment, the glove port was removed and the specimen extracted (without further fascial extension) via the single port access site. A side-to-side stapled anastomosis was performed in the usual fashion and re-laparoscopy done after return of the bowel into the peritoneum.
Comment: Single port laparoscopic-assisted surgery is applicable to the re-operative setting in selected patients. Its advantages particularly apply to young patients who value body image and reduced scarring.
Laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for benign diverticular disease
Dr. Armando Melani beautifully demonstrates a laparoscopic sigmoidectomy technique for a benign diverticular condition. He provides tips and tricks to perfectly expose the operating field and recommends an extensive approach to the left colon with primary mobilization of the splenic flexure using a posterior medial approach with a late vascular approach. The technique and its performance is amply discussed by the panel of experts present, hence providing a very instructive demonstration.
The operator also discusses the different types of energy devices available as well as the tricks to safely perform an upper colorectal anastomosis. This film provides plenty of detailed information for beginners and experts alike to allow them to perform a laparoscopic sigmoidectomy in a perfect fashion.
J Leroy, A Melani, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
5812 views
137 likes
3 comments
33:07
Laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for benign diverticular disease
Dr. Armando Melani beautifully demonstrates a laparoscopic sigmoidectomy technique for a benign diverticular condition. He provides tips and tricks to perfectly expose the operating field and recommends an extensive approach to the left colon with primary mobilization of the splenic flexure using a posterior medial approach with a late vascular approach. The technique and its performance is amply discussed by the panel of experts present, hence providing a very instructive demonstration.
The operator also discusses the different types of energy devices available as well as the tricks to safely perform an upper colorectal anastomosis. This film provides plenty of detailed information for beginners and experts alike to allow them to perform a laparoscopic sigmoidectomy in a perfect fashion.
Colonic stomal prolapse and parastomal incisional hernia: laparoscopic Sugarbaker repair procedure
The objective of this film is to demonstrate stoma prolapse and parastomal incisional hernia repair according to the technique described by Sugarbaker in open surgery, reproduced here with a laparoscopic approach.
Mesh placement into the abdominal cavity presents a risk that seems minimized by the development of dual-sided composite meshes, with one collagen coating that will be in contact with the digestive tract, hence limiting the risk of adhesions.
The principle of the Sugarbaker technique is to create a colonic zigzag route and to fix it on the non-absorbable side of the mesh, thereby preventing colonic prolapse. The mesh is also used as an obstacle to the passage of small bowel loops into the parastomal defect.
Here, the difficulty lies in the combined presence of an incisional hernia and prolapse on a diverting transverse colostomy. The risk of vascular injury is all the more important. Here, authors highlight pitfalls as well as tips and tricks to overcome them.
J Leroy, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
4011 views
108 likes
0 comments
11:09
Colonic stomal prolapse and parastomal incisional hernia: laparoscopic Sugarbaker repair procedure
The objective of this film is to demonstrate stoma prolapse and parastomal incisional hernia repair according to the technique described by Sugarbaker in open surgery, reproduced here with a laparoscopic approach.
Mesh placement into the abdominal cavity presents a risk that seems minimized by the development of dual-sided composite meshes, with one collagen coating that will be in contact with the digestive tract, hence limiting the risk of adhesions.
The principle of the Sugarbaker technique is to create a colonic zigzag route and to fix it on the non-absorbable side of the mesh, thereby preventing colonic prolapse. The mesh is also used as an obstacle to the passage of small bowel loops into the parastomal defect.
Here, the difficulty lies in the combined presence of an incisional hernia and prolapse on a diverting transverse colostomy. The risk of vascular injury is all the more important. Here, authors highlight pitfalls as well as tips and tricks to overcome them.
Right hemicolectomy for appendicular mucocele
The appendicular mucocele is defined by a dilation of the appendix and an unusual accumulation of mucus within its lumen. It is a rare pathology which affects 0.25% of the population.
Its histological discovery is made during the postoperative phase in nearly 70% of cases. Appendicular mucoceles, which are secondary to a muco-secretive tumor, can potentially be a problem if they are malignant, especially in case of preoperative or intraoperative rupture, with a risk of gelatinous disease of the peritoneum.
The positive diagnosis is based on a histological study, which must be systematic, for all appendectomy specimens. Preoperatively, it is essential to recognize an appendicular mucocele, in order to properly adapt the surgical technique, and to potentially envisage a more global surgical resection technique.
We present the case of a 70-year-old man, treated in our unit for right iliac fossa abscess in which an explorative laparoscopy was decided upon after one month of medical treatment.
L Marx, F Costantino, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
5023 views
88 likes
1 comment
07:16
Right hemicolectomy for appendicular mucocele
The appendicular mucocele is defined by a dilation of the appendix and an unusual accumulation of mucus within its lumen. It is a rare pathology which affects 0.25% of the population.
Its histological discovery is made during the postoperative phase in nearly 70% of cases. Appendicular mucoceles, which are secondary to a muco-secretive tumor, can potentially be a problem if they are malignant, especially in case of preoperative or intraoperative rupture, with a risk of gelatinous disease of the peritoneum.
The positive diagnosis is based on a histological study, which must be systematic, for all appendectomy specimens. Preoperatively, it is essential to recognize an appendicular mucocele, in order to properly adapt the surgical technique, and to potentially envisage a more global surgical resection technique.
We present the case of a 70-year-old man, treated in our unit for right iliac fossa abscess in which an explorative laparoscopy was decided upon after one month of medical treatment.
Suprapubic single incision laparoscopic left hemicolectomy (SILLH): an alternative to the umbilical access
Background: Single incision laparoscopy (SIL) has been described for colorectal surgery because it mainly provides an improved cosmetic outcome. A suprapubic access can be considered an alternative to the umbilical site for left hemicolectomy (LH) because the scar remains under the bikini line and can be considered cosmetically acceptable.

Video: A 61-year-old man was admitted to hospital for adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon; preoperative work-up did not show the presence of secondary lesions. A suprapubic SILLH was proposed to the patient. The technique consisted in performing the procedure through an initial 3.5cm skin incision, localized suprapubically, with the insertion of 3 reusable trocars vertically in a pararectal axis along with DAPRI curved reusable instruments (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tüttlingen, Germany). The vascular plane was firstly controlled by clips and, after mobilization of the entire left colon, the upper rectum was transected and the specimen was removed using the same access; a conventional circular transanal anastomosis was performed.

Results: Laparoscopic time was 119 minutes, estimated blood loss was 20cc, and the final scar length measured 4.5cm. Pathology confirmed the presence of a colon adenocarcinoma (pT2N0Mx). Postoperative pain was minimal, allowing the patient to be discharged on postoperative day 4.

Conclusions: Suprapubic SILLH offers the option to enlarge the skin incision according to the specimen’s size without any cosmetic damage, because it remains under the bikini line. The dissection plane appears in front of the access and postoperative pain remains minimal.
G Dapri
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
4179 views
29 likes
1 comment
08:07
Suprapubic single incision laparoscopic left hemicolectomy (SILLH): an alternative to the umbilical access
Background: Single incision laparoscopy (SIL) has been described for colorectal surgery because it mainly provides an improved cosmetic outcome. A suprapubic access can be considered an alternative to the umbilical site for left hemicolectomy (LH) because the scar remains under the bikini line and can be considered cosmetically acceptable.

Video: A 61-year-old man was admitted to hospital for adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon; preoperative work-up did not show the presence of secondary lesions. A suprapubic SILLH was proposed to the patient. The technique consisted in performing the procedure through an initial 3.5cm skin incision, localized suprapubically, with the insertion of 3 reusable trocars vertically in a pararectal axis along with DAPRI curved reusable instruments (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tüttlingen, Germany). The vascular plane was firstly controlled by clips and, after mobilization of the entire left colon, the upper rectum was transected and the specimen was removed using the same access; a conventional circular transanal anastomosis was performed.

Results: Laparoscopic time was 119 minutes, estimated blood loss was 20cc, and the final scar length measured 4.5cm. Pathology confirmed the presence of a colon adenocarcinoma (pT2N0Mx). Postoperative pain was minimal, allowing the patient to be discharged on postoperative day 4.

Conclusions: Suprapubic SILLH offers the option to enlarge the skin incision according to the specimen’s size without any cosmetic damage, because it remains under the bikini line. The dissection plane appears in front of the access and postoperative pain remains minimal.
Laparoscopic revision of stenotic colorectal anastomosis
Background: Colorectal anastomosis is usually performed using a circular stapler inserted transanally. Postoperative complications such as strictures are rare and related to various factors like ischemia, poor vascularization, and previous leak. This video shows a laparoscopic revision of a stenotic colorectal anastomosis, solved with a new hand-sewn anastomosis.

Video: A 51-year-old man underwent laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for symptomatic diverticulosis. At that time, a transanal circular mechanical end-to-end colorectal anastomosis was performed using a 29mm circular stapler. After 3 months of follow-up, a symptomatic stenotic colorectal anastomosis was evidenced, and endoscopic dilatation (repeated 3 times) remained unsuccessful. Preoperative barium enema showed a stenotic anastomosis and some residual diverticulosis. A laparoscopic 3-trocar revision was scheduled. On exploration of the abdominal cavity, the anastomosis appeared thickened and strictly adherent to the left ureter. After proper mobilization, a segmental colorectal resection was performed and a new anastomosis was fashioned in an end-to-end hand-sewn technique.

Results: The procedure was completed by laparoscopy without additional trocars. Operative time was 202 minutes and blood loss 20cc. The patient was allowed to be discharged on the 4th postoperative day, and after 6 months, he is fine, without intestinal trouble.

Conclusions: Postoperative complications of colorectal anastomosis, such as strictures, can be managed laparoscopically. A new hand-sewn anastomosis is feasible and it allows for control of the vascularization and openings of both colonic and rectal lumens.
G Dapri
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
1909 views
20 likes
0 comments
06:20
Laparoscopic revision of stenotic colorectal anastomosis
Background: Colorectal anastomosis is usually performed using a circular stapler inserted transanally. Postoperative complications such as strictures are rare and related to various factors like ischemia, poor vascularization, and previous leak. This video shows a laparoscopic revision of a stenotic colorectal anastomosis, solved with a new hand-sewn anastomosis.

Video: A 51-year-old man underwent laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for symptomatic diverticulosis. At that time, a transanal circular mechanical end-to-end colorectal anastomosis was performed using a 29mm circular stapler. After 3 months of follow-up, a symptomatic stenotic colorectal anastomosis was evidenced, and endoscopic dilatation (repeated 3 times) remained unsuccessful. Preoperative barium enema showed a stenotic anastomosis and some residual diverticulosis. A laparoscopic 3-trocar revision was scheduled. On exploration of the abdominal cavity, the anastomosis appeared thickened and strictly adherent to the left ureter. After proper mobilization, a segmental colorectal resection was performed and a new anastomosis was fashioned in an end-to-end hand-sewn technique.

Results: The procedure was completed by laparoscopy without additional trocars. Operative time was 202 minutes and blood loss 20cc. The patient was allowed to be discharged on the 4th postoperative day, and after 6 months, he is fine, without intestinal trouble.

Conclusions: Postoperative complications of colorectal anastomosis, such as strictures, can be managed laparoscopically. A new hand-sewn anastomosis is feasible and it allows for control of the vascularization and openings of both colonic and rectal lumens.