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Monthly publications

#January 2015
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Laparoscopic distal gastrectomy with Billroth II reconstruction for peptic ulcer obstruction
This live surgery video demonstrates a laparoscopic distal gastrectomy with Billroth II reconstruction in a patient with pyloric stenosis which was caused by peptic ulcer. Treatment using balloon dilatation failed. The fibrotic area of the duodenal ulcer was approached by fine dissection and ligation of right gastro-epiploic and right gastric vessels. The dissection was performed around the duodenum until an adequate margin could be obtained in the healthy portion of the distal duodenum. The duodenum was then transected by means of a stapler. A relatively large dilated stomach including the antrum and part of the gastric body was transected, and a Billroth II gastrojejunostomy was performed.
HK Yang
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
3019 views
153 likes
0 comments
21:58
Laparoscopic distal gastrectomy with Billroth II reconstruction for peptic ulcer obstruction
This live surgery video demonstrates a laparoscopic distal gastrectomy with Billroth II reconstruction in a patient with pyloric stenosis which was caused by peptic ulcer. Treatment using balloon dilatation failed. The fibrotic area of the duodenal ulcer was approached by fine dissection and ligation of right gastro-epiploic and right gastric vessels. The dissection was performed around the duodenum until an adequate margin could be obtained in the healthy portion of the distal duodenum. The duodenum was then transected by means of a stapler. A relatively large dilated stomach including the antrum and part of the gastric body was transected, and a Billroth II gastrojejunostomy was performed.
Pure laparoscopic posterior sectionectomy and wedge resections for bilobar colorectal liver metastases
We report the case of a 74-year-old gentleman who underwent a laparoscopic liver resection for bilobar colorectal liver metastases. The patient presented with newly diagnosed liver metastases one year after undergoing a right hemi-colectomy followed by six cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy for a T3N1 adenocarcinoma. After six cycles of preoperative systemic therapy, a 30 percent reduction in the volume of the liver lesions is obtained. Preoperative three-dimensional reconstruction of the cross-sectional imaging is obtained to plan a laparoscopic liver resection. Virtual hepatectomy is then performed using the virtual three-dimensional model. Five trocars are used as depicted. The camera is initially positioned in a 10mm umbilical port. It will be placed in a 12mm port during parenchymal transection. The subxiphoid port is used by the assistant for liver traction and suctioning. The procedure is initiated by lyzing adhesions that resulted from the previous cholecystectomy and right hemi-colectomy. An umbilical tape is placed around the portal pedicle for eventual intermittent clamping during the resection. An intraoperative ultrasound confirms that no additional lesions are present. The transection line is drawn on the liver surface under ultrasound guidance.
The portal pedicle is clamped to begin the parenchymal transection. The liver capsule is first divided using an energy device. Deeper parenchymal transection is performed with an ultrasonic dissector. After 15 minutes, the pedicle clamping is taken down by melting and extracting the proximal clip previously placed. This procedure will be repeated throughout the parenchymal transection to obtain a posterior sectionectomy. Hemostasis of the transected liver is obtained. A non-anatomical segment III resection is then performed. Finally, the fourth lesion is resected with a non-anatomical segment IV resection. These specimens are placed in a bag and extracted through a small extension of the umbilical port.
P Pessaux, J Hallet, R Memeo, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1660 views
54 likes
0 comments
10:01
Pure laparoscopic posterior sectionectomy and wedge resections for bilobar colorectal liver metastases
We report the case of a 74-year-old gentleman who underwent a laparoscopic liver resection for bilobar colorectal liver metastases. The patient presented with newly diagnosed liver metastases one year after undergoing a right hemi-colectomy followed by six cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy for a T3N1 adenocarcinoma. After six cycles of preoperative systemic therapy, a 30 percent reduction in the volume of the liver lesions is obtained. Preoperative three-dimensional reconstruction of the cross-sectional imaging is obtained to plan a laparoscopic liver resection. Virtual hepatectomy is then performed using the virtual three-dimensional model. Five trocars are used as depicted. The camera is initially positioned in a 10mm umbilical port. It will be placed in a 12mm port during parenchymal transection. The subxiphoid port is used by the assistant for liver traction and suctioning. The procedure is initiated by lyzing adhesions that resulted from the previous cholecystectomy and right hemi-colectomy. An umbilical tape is placed around the portal pedicle for eventual intermittent clamping during the resection. An intraoperative ultrasound confirms that no additional lesions are present. The transection line is drawn on the liver surface under ultrasound guidance.
The portal pedicle is clamped to begin the parenchymal transection. The liver capsule is first divided using an energy device. Deeper parenchymal transection is performed with an ultrasonic dissector. After 15 minutes, the pedicle clamping is taken down by melting and extracting the proximal clip previously placed. This procedure will be repeated throughout the parenchymal transection to obtain a posterior sectionectomy. Hemostasis of the transected liver is obtained. A non-anatomical segment III resection is then performed. Finally, the fourth lesion is resected with a non-anatomical segment IV resection. These specimens are placed in a bag and extracted through a small extension of the umbilical port.
Acute small bowel ischemia: laparoscopic exploration and treatment
We present the case of a 63-year-old male patient admitted to the emergency department with severe acute abdominal pain unresponsive to symptomatic treatment. The clinical examination revealed a generalized peritoneal reaction. The diagnosis of small bowel ischemia with free peritoneal fluid without occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) or the superior mesenteric vein (SMV) was established by means of a contrast injected CT-scan.
A laparoscopic exploration allowed to discover a segmental small bowel ischemic necrosis with severe hemorrhagic congestion of the bowel wall. After verifying that the rest of the small bowel and the colon were viable, a laparoscopic resection was performed with an intracorporeal side-to-side anastomosis. The postoperative course was uneventful with patient discharge on day 4.
Pathological examination confirmed that the resected segment of 92cm had ischemia of the mucosa and of the serosa with intensive congestion and hemorrhagic effusion. The patient’s one-month follow-up was uneventful. A programmed cardiological, hematological and immunological consultation and work-up to look for thrombotic risk factors was negative.
Acute small bowel ischemia is an unusual cause of acute abdomen that is difficult to diagnose due to its non-specific clinical signs. Clinical suspicion is warranted in patients with a past history of cardiovascular thrombotic conditions or hypercoagulable states. In 50% of cases, it is caused by arterial obstruction, in 20 to 30% of cases by non-occlusive arterial ischemia, and by venous occlusion [1] in 5 to 15% of cases. It has a high mortality rate of 59 to 93% and patient survival is highly dependent on a timely diagnosis and treatment. The European Association for Endoscopic Surgery (EAES) consensus for the laparoscopic approach to the acute abdomen states that there is no published data demonstrating advantages in the diagnosis and treatment of acute bowel ischemia by laparoscopy [2]. However, laparoscopy may prove beneficial in confirming the diagnosis in doubtful cases, calculate the extension of the ischemic small bowel segment, and offer a treatment option in cases of segmental necrosis.
1. Brandt LJ, Boley SJ. AGA technical review on intestinal ischemia. American Gastrointestinal Association. Gastroenterology 2000;118:954-68.
2. Agresta F, Ansaloni L, Baiocchi GL, Bergamini C, Campanile FC, Carlucci M, Cocorullo G, Corradi A, Franzato B, Lupo M, Mandalà V, Mirabella A, Pernazza G, Piccoli M, Staudacher C, Vettoretto N, Zago M, Lettieri E, Levati A, Pietrini D, Scaglione M, De Masi S, De Placido G, Francucci M, Rasi M, Fingerhut A, Uranüs S, Garattini S. Laparoscopic approach to acute abdomen from the Consensus Development Conference of the Società Italiana di Chirurgia Endoscopica e nuove tecnologie (SICE), Associazione Chirurghi Ospedalieri Italiani (ACOI), Società Italiana di Chirurgia (SIC), Società Italiana di Chirurgia d'Urgenza e del Trauma (SICUT), Società Italiana di Chirurgia nell'Ospedalità Privata (SICOP), and the European Association for Endoscopic Surgery (EAES). Surg Endosc 2012;26:2134-64.
D Ntourakis, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
2159 views
68 likes
0 comments
19:57
Acute small bowel ischemia: laparoscopic exploration and treatment
We present the case of a 63-year-old male patient admitted to the emergency department with severe acute abdominal pain unresponsive to symptomatic treatment. The clinical examination revealed a generalized peritoneal reaction. The diagnosis of small bowel ischemia with free peritoneal fluid without occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) or the superior mesenteric vein (SMV) was established by means of a contrast injected CT-scan.
A laparoscopic exploration allowed to discover a segmental small bowel ischemic necrosis with severe hemorrhagic congestion of the bowel wall. After verifying that the rest of the small bowel and the colon were viable, a laparoscopic resection was performed with an intracorporeal side-to-side anastomosis. The postoperative course was uneventful with patient discharge on day 4.
Pathological examination confirmed that the resected segment of 92cm had ischemia of the mucosa and of the serosa with intensive congestion and hemorrhagic effusion. The patient’s one-month follow-up was uneventful. A programmed cardiological, hematological and immunological consultation and work-up to look for thrombotic risk factors was negative.
Acute small bowel ischemia is an unusual cause of acute abdomen that is difficult to diagnose due to its non-specific clinical signs. Clinical suspicion is warranted in patients with a past history of cardiovascular thrombotic conditions or hypercoagulable states. In 50% of cases, it is caused by arterial obstruction, in 20 to 30% of cases by non-occlusive arterial ischemia, and by venous occlusion [1] in 5 to 15% of cases. It has a high mortality rate of 59 to 93% and patient survival is highly dependent on a timely diagnosis and treatment. The European Association for Endoscopic Surgery (EAES) consensus for the laparoscopic approach to the acute abdomen states that there is no published data demonstrating advantages in the diagnosis and treatment of acute bowel ischemia by laparoscopy [2]. However, laparoscopy may prove beneficial in confirming the diagnosis in doubtful cases, calculate the extension of the ischemic small bowel segment, and offer a treatment option in cases of segmental necrosis.
1. Brandt LJ, Boley SJ. AGA technical review on intestinal ischemia. American Gastrointestinal Association. Gastroenterology 2000;118:954-68.
2. Agresta F, Ansaloni L, Baiocchi GL, Bergamini C, Campanile FC, Carlucci M, Cocorullo G, Corradi A, Franzato B, Lupo M, Mandalà V, Mirabella A, Pernazza G, Piccoli M, Staudacher C, Vettoretto N, Zago M, Lettieri E, Levati A, Pietrini D, Scaglione M, De Masi S, De Placido G, Francucci M, Rasi M, Fingerhut A, Uranüs S, Garattini S. Laparoscopic approach to acute abdomen from the Consensus Development Conference of the Società Italiana di Chirurgia Endoscopica e nuove tecnologie (SICE), Associazione Chirurghi Ospedalieri Italiani (ACOI), Società Italiana di Chirurgia (SIC), Società Italiana di Chirurgia d'Urgenza e del Trauma (SICUT), Società Italiana di Chirurgia nell'Ospedalità Privata (SICOP), and the European Association for Endoscopic Surgery (EAES). Surg Endosc 2012;26:2134-64.
Laparoscopic transhiatal resection of giant esophageal leiomyoma
This is the case of a 36-year-old male patient who had slowly progressing symptoms for 10 years. These symptoms were the following: hiccups, progressive dysphagia, first for solids, and then for liquids, and gastro-esophageal reflux. In 2003, the patient was first evaluated in a private clinic and diagnosed with esophageal wall hernia. In 2010, his symptoms were still present and he was evaluated by a physician who performed a new endoscopy, which demonstrated a 90% obstruction of the esophageal lumen. A biopsy was also performed. It was negative for malignancy, hence providing the diagnosis of esophageal leiomyoma.
In December 2011, a CT-scan and endoscopic ultrasound were performed leading to the conclusion of an esophageal leiomyoma. A laparoscopic transhiatal resection of the esophageal leiomyoma was decided upon in July 2012.
This case is essential because it shows the usefulness of a hook clamp to facilitate traction of the leiomyoma. Additionally, it shows an intraoperative complication consisting in a perforation of the esophageal mucosa, which was sutured by means of Vicryl 4/0.
DU Castro Nuñez, L Bao Romero, L Belloni Caceres
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
498 views
4 likes
0 comments
09:57
Laparoscopic transhiatal resection of giant esophageal leiomyoma
This is the case of a 36-year-old male patient who had slowly progressing symptoms for 10 years. These symptoms were the following: hiccups, progressive dysphagia, first for solids, and then for liquids, and gastro-esophageal reflux. In 2003, the patient was first evaluated in a private clinic and diagnosed with esophageal wall hernia. In 2010, his symptoms were still present and he was evaluated by a physician who performed a new endoscopy, which demonstrated a 90% obstruction of the esophageal lumen. A biopsy was also performed. It was negative for malignancy, hence providing the diagnosis of esophageal leiomyoma.
In December 2011, a CT-scan and endoscopic ultrasound were performed leading to the conclusion of an esophageal leiomyoma. A laparoscopic transhiatal resection of the esophageal leiomyoma was decided upon in July 2012.
This case is essential because it shows the usefulness of a hook clamp to facilitate traction of the leiomyoma. Additionally, it shows an intraoperative complication consisting in a perforation of the esophageal mucosa, which was sutured by means of Vicryl 4/0.
Laparoscopic treatment of giant gastric trichobezoar
Trichobezoar is a rare condition that may pose a diagnostic challenge. Patients with this condition often have an underlying psychiatric illness. The condition should be entertained, especially in young females. We report a 32-year-old female patient with complaints of early satiety, nausea and weight loss (10Kg for the past 1 year). The patient has a history of family abuse (domestic violence from her father) and obsessive-compulsive disorder with trichotillomania. We decided to treat the condition laparoscopically. A four-trocar technique was used (two 10mm and two 5mm trocars). The postoperative period was uneventful. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 3 without any complaint.
G Jelev, E Kostadinov, B Korukov, B Vladimirov, D Damyanov
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1042 views
34 likes
0 comments
08:00
Laparoscopic treatment of giant gastric trichobezoar
Trichobezoar is a rare condition that may pose a diagnostic challenge. Patients with this condition often have an underlying psychiatric illness. The condition should be entertained, especially in young females. We report a 32-year-old female patient with complaints of early satiety, nausea and weight loss (10Kg for the past 1 year). The patient has a history of family abuse (domestic violence from her father) and obsessive-compulsive disorder with trichotillomania. We decided to treat the condition laparoscopically. A four-trocar technique was used (two 10mm and two 5mm trocars). The postoperative period was uneventful. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 3 without any complaint.
Avoiding entry complications
More then 50% of major laparoscopic complications occur during the initial entry into the abdominal wall. In this lecture, the most frequent entry techniques are reviewed (Veress needle, open and direct entry techniques) and compared in terms of entry risks. New devices for the entry process have recently emerged. Nevertheless, the risk of entry complications has remained the same since the last 25 years. The entry mode is also discussed in particular cases such as previous midline laparotomy, morbid obesity, and slimness. Above all, we should use the entry technique which makes us feel more comfortable since there is no evidence that any single technique or specialized instruments to enter the abdomen helps to reduce the occurrence of vascular and organ injuries.
J Faria
Lecture
3 years ago
7472 views
542 likes
1 comment
19:07
Avoiding entry complications
More then 50% of major laparoscopic complications occur during the initial entry into the abdominal wall. In this lecture, the most frequent entry techniques are reviewed (Veress needle, open and direct entry techniques) and compared in terms of entry risks. New devices for the entry process have recently emerged. Nevertheless, the risk of entry complications has remained the same since the last 25 years. The entry mode is also discussed in particular cases such as previous midline laparotomy, morbid obesity, and slimness. Above all, we should use the entry technique which makes us feel more comfortable since there is no evidence that any single technique or specialized instruments to enter the abdomen helps to reduce the occurrence of vascular and organ injuries.
Vascular anomalies found by retroperitoneal laparoscopic para-aortic lymphadenectomy
The retroperitoneum is an area of great interest in gynecologic oncology. The knowledge of the anatomy and potential vascular anomalies, which can be found, can help prevent complications.
The retroperitoneal vascular anomalies are often asymptomatic. Their prevalence ranges between 2.4 and 30% according to the published literature.
Its diagnosis includes imaging techniques or it can be made during surgery.
Although the presence of these variations may go unnoticed, different potential complications can be devastating (e.g., hemorrhage, loss of organs or even death).
In this video, the authors demonstrate some variations of retroperitoneal vessels diagnosed during the practice of retroperitoneal laparoscopic para-aortic lymphadenectomy performed in gynecologic cancer patients (advanced cervical cancer, endometrial carcinoma, and ovarian cancer in early stages).
In our case series of 60 procedures performed during 2011, 2012, and 2013, vascular anatomical anomalies are 33.33% (20 cases) and all of them were diagnosed during surgery.
First, the anomaly of the renal vascular territory (arterial or venous) was the most frequent, followed by anomalies which affect gonadal vessels, and finally by great vessel anomalies.
H Di Fiore, MC González Álvarez, R Sanz Baro, C Redondo Guisasola, JE García Villayzan
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1944 views
59 likes
0 comments
13:28
Vascular anomalies found by retroperitoneal laparoscopic para-aortic lymphadenectomy
The retroperitoneum is an area of great interest in gynecologic oncology. The knowledge of the anatomy and potential vascular anomalies, which can be found, can help prevent complications.
The retroperitoneal vascular anomalies are often asymptomatic. Their prevalence ranges between 2.4 and 30% according to the published literature.
Its diagnosis includes imaging techniques or it can be made during surgery.
Although the presence of these variations may go unnoticed, different potential complications can be devastating (e.g., hemorrhage, loss of organs or even death).
In this video, the authors demonstrate some variations of retroperitoneal vessels diagnosed during the practice of retroperitoneal laparoscopic para-aortic lymphadenectomy performed in gynecologic cancer patients (advanced cervical cancer, endometrial carcinoma, and ovarian cancer in early stages).
In our case series of 60 procedures performed during 2011, 2012, and 2013, vascular anatomical anomalies are 33.33% (20 cases) and all of them were diagnosed during surgery.
First, the anomaly of the renal vascular territory (arterial or venous) was the most frequent, followed by anomalies which affect gonadal vessels, and finally by great vessel anomalies.
Anterior and posterior laparoscopic mesh removal due to pelvic pain, subtotal hysterectomy, mesh replacement, and Burch procedure
This is the case of a 69-year-old woman presenting with pelvic pain after laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy. The patient has a history of one vaginal birth, laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy with uterine preservation combined with a transobturator tape (TOT) sling procedure performed in 2013.
The following symptoms appeared after surgery: invalidating pelvic pain, especially in an upright position, severe terminal constipation, worsening of a previously mild stress urinary incontinence.
On clinical examination, a high rectocele (grade 2/3), a cystocele, and elective pain at the level of the TOT sling were observed. MRI revealed a perineal inflammation between the anterior aspect of the vagina and the urethra, at the level of the lower third of the urethra. A fibrotic area can be noted at the level of the rectovaginal space.
Her TOT sling was partially resected in January 2014.
Cystoscopy ruled out the presence of mesh erosion. Hysteroscopy was normal.
Endometrial biopsy demonstrated an atrophic endometrium.
In this surgery, the anterior and posterior meshes are removed. A subtotal hysterectomy combined with the replacement of meshes were performed, followed by a Burch procedure.
A Wattiez, I Argay, F Asencio, J Faria, L Schwartz
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1722 views
63 likes
1 comment
33:56
Anterior and posterior laparoscopic mesh removal due to pelvic pain, subtotal hysterectomy, mesh replacement, and Burch procedure
This is the case of a 69-year-old woman presenting with pelvic pain after laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy. The patient has a history of one vaginal birth, laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy with uterine preservation combined with a transobturator tape (TOT) sling procedure performed in 2013.
The following symptoms appeared after surgery: invalidating pelvic pain, especially in an upright position, severe terminal constipation, worsening of a previously mild stress urinary incontinence.
On clinical examination, a high rectocele (grade 2/3), a cystocele, and elective pain at the level of the TOT sling were observed. MRI revealed a perineal inflammation between the anterior aspect of the vagina and the urethra, at the level of the lower third of the urethra. A fibrotic area can be noted at the level of the rectovaginal space.
Her TOT sling was partially resected in January 2014.
Cystoscopy ruled out the presence of mesh erosion. Hysteroscopy was normal.
Endometrial biopsy demonstrated an atrophic endometrium.
In this surgery, the anterior and posterior meshes are removed. A subtotal hysterectomy combined with the replacement of meshes were performed, followed by a Burch procedure.
Single stage diagnosis and treatment by EUS and ERCP of a pancreatic stone causing an acute pancreatitis
Biliopancreatic stones are the ‘primum movens’ of acute pancreatitis. Pure pancreatic stones are rare. However, when present, they are the main cause of acute obstruction of the main pancreatic duct. Conversely, when present in chronic pancreatitis, they are mostly responsible for pancreatic glandular insufficiency. Medical treatment, radiologic evaluation (by MRI or CT-scan), and therapeutic endoscopy constitute the standard of care (SOC).
Here, we report the case of a 25-year-old man, admitted for upper middle abdominal pain and hyperamylasemia, without anomalies in liver function tests, and who underwent biliopancreatic EUS. A pancreatic stone was diagnosed and immediately treated by endoscopic pancreatic sphincterotomy and extraction.
Gf Donatelli, B Meduri
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1111 views
41 likes
0 comments
05:10
Single stage diagnosis and treatment by EUS and ERCP of a pancreatic stone causing an acute pancreatitis
Biliopancreatic stones are the ‘primum movens’ of acute pancreatitis. Pure pancreatic stones are rare. However, when present, they are the main cause of acute obstruction of the main pancreatic duct. Conversely, when present in chronic pancreatitis, they are mostly responsible for pancreatic glandular insufficiency. Medical treatment, radiologic evaluation (by MRI or CT-scan), and therapeutic endoscopy constitute the standard of care (SOC).
Here, we report the case of a 25-year-old man, admitted for upper middle abdominal pain and hyperamylasemia, without anomalies in liver function tests, and who underwent biliopancreatic EUS. A pancreatic stone was diagnosed and immediately treated by endoscopic pancreatic sphincterotomy and extraction.
Complex left upper lobectomy with lymphadenectomy by robotic assisted thoracoscopy (CPRL-3) for cT2N2 non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC)
This video demonstrates a left upper lobectomy for the management of a proximal cT2N2M0 lung tumor. It is usually considered a contraindication of minimally invasive surgery. Our aim is to show the feasibility and the safety of the procedure. Robotic surgery will allow for more minimally invasive indications.
The tumor lies proximally to the left trunk of the pulmonary artery which could be a contraindication to a minimally invasive surgery. A CT-scan combined with a 3D reconstruction helps to rule out the existence of pulmonary artery invasion. Hilar adenopathies as well as adenopathies of the aortopulmonary window present a hypermetabolism on PET-scan. No neoadjuvant chemotherapy is performed since a R0 surgery is potentially feasible immediately and can be associated with a full lymphadenectomy.
This video presents our technique of robotically assisted left upper lobectomy combined with a lymph node dissection. We have attempted to standardize our lung resection technique using 6 areas of dissection to gain in efficacy and save time. The first operative step is to free the triangular ligament and to sample potential lymph nodes (station No. 9). A hilar lymphadenectomy (lymph node station No. 10) is then performed using a posterior approach first followed by a subcarinal approach (lymph node #7, by skeletonizing the pulmonary artery and the left main bronchus. The third step of the procedure is to dissect the fissure to skeletonize the pulmonary artery and its lingular branches as well as branches of the posterior fissure, dissection of lymph node stations No. 11 is performed simultaneously. The elements of the hilum are then approached using an anterior approach. The superior pulmonary vein is dissected. The roof of the hilum is then freed. The left upper bronchus is divided last. Dissection of lymph node station No. 5 completes the procedure with preservation of the left recurrent nerve
Abbreviation:
CPRL-3: complete portal robotic lobectomy using 3 arms
J Cahais, JM Baste, C Peillon
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
696 views
18 likes
0 comments
11:07
Complex left upper lobectomy with lymphadenectomy by robotic assisted thoracoscopy (CPRL-3) for cT2N2 non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC)
This video demonstrates a left upper lobectomy for the management of a proximal cT2N2M0 lung tumor. It is usually considered a contraindication of minimally invasive surgery. Our aim is to show the feasibility and the safety of the procedure. Robotic surgery will allow for more minimally invasive indications.
The tumor lies proximally to the left trunk of the pulmonary artery which could be a contraindication to a minimally invasive surgery. A CT-scan combined with a 3D reconstruction helps to rule out the existence of pulmonary artery invasion. Hilar adenopathies as well as adenopathies of the aortopulmonary window present a hypermetabolism on PET-scan. No neoadjuvant chemotherapy is performed since a R0 surgery is potentially feasible immediately and can be associated with a full lymphadenectomy.
This video presents our technique of robotically assisted left upper lobectomy combined with a lymph node dissection. We have attempted to standardize our lung resection technique using 6 areas of dissection to gain in efficacy and save time. The first operative step is to free the triangular ligament and to sample potential lymph nodes (station No. 9). A hilar lymphadenectomy (lymph node station No. 10) is then performed using a posterior approach first followed by a subcarinal approach (lymph node #7, by skeletonizing the pulmonary artery and the left main bronchus. The third step of the procedure is to dissect the fissure to skeletonize the pulmonary artery and its lingular branches as well as branches of the posterior fissure, dissection of lymph node stations No. 11 is performed simultaneously. The elements of the hilum are then approached using an anterior approach. The superior pulmonary vein is dissected. The roof of the hilum is then freed. The left upper bronchus is divided last. Dissection of lymph node station No. 5 completes the procedure with preservation of the left recurrent nerve
Abbreviation:
CPRL-3: complete portal robotic lobectomy using 3 arms
Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass redo after sleeve gastrectomy associated with intrathoracic sleeve migration
Sleeve gastrectomy is a standard procedure in bariatric surgery nowadays. However, common contraindications involve the presence of gastroesophageal reflux and hiatal hernia. Here, we present the case of a morbidly obese female patient with a past surgical history of a Nissen fundoplication reversed in 2012 because of dysphagia. A sleeve gastrectomy had been performed 2 years ago complicated by an intrathoracic migration and gastric twist as discovered in the preoperative control followed by dysphagia, reflux, and vomiting. A conversion to a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass has been decided upon.
L Marx, S Tzedakis, HA Mercoli, S Perretta, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1369 views
46 likes
0 comments
09:21
Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass redo after sleeve gastrectomy associated with intrathoracic sleeve migration
Sleeve gastrectomy is a standard procedure in bariatric surgery nowadays. However, common contraindications involve the presence of gastroesophageal reflux and hiatal hernia. Here, we present the case of a morbidly obese female patient with a past surgical history of a Nissen fundoplication reversed in 2012 because of dysphagia. A sleeve gastrectomy had been performed 2 years ago complicated by an intrathoracic migration and gastric twist as discovered in the preoperative control followed by dysphagia, reflux, and vomiting. A conversion to a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass has been decided upon.